Chrysler Sebring Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems with the Chrysler Sebring as reported by actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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Known Problems

Sensor failure inside the distributor can cause intermittent stalling or a failure to start. In addition, the wires to the distributor are susceptible to internal damage, which can cause the same symptoms.

Intermittent problems with the radio can typically be solved by updating the radio software.

There have been reports of premature head gasket failure; an updated gasket design is available to correct this problem.

A squeak heard while turning the steering wheel may indicate that the rubber boot seal on the steering shaft needs some trimming and lubrication.

An engine Oil leak may develop at the cam sensor o-ring seal. Our technicians tell us this is often misdiagnosed as an external head gasket leak.

A damaged oil pump (possibly caused by interference with the AC compressor bracket) can also cause a knocking noise from the engine compartment; a modified bracket is available from Dodge.

When the outside temperature is above 90° F and the AC is running, a knocking noise from the engine compartment may be heard, especially when the vehicle is stopped or idling. This is commonly caused by a failing AC compressor assembly which will require  replacement.

A rattle from the rear of the vehicle may indicate that the rear shock absorbers are defective. Updated shocks are available; however, careful inspection of all suspension components should be performed before any parts are replaced.

A defective EGR valve can cause a popping or knocking noise from the engine compartment. It is usually heard when the engine is warm (between 1600 and 1800 RPM).

The automatic transmission can develop problems like erratic shifting, rough shifting, or delayed gear engagement. Repairs for many of these problems are outlined in service bulletins.