Chevrolet Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems with the Chevrolet as reported by actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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Known Problems

One or more heater & AC (HVAC) air delivery and/or temperature mode door actuator may fail. This can result in incorrect air delivery or temperature. If this occurs, fault code(s) stored in the HVAC control module should be available to assist with diagnoses.

The upper dash may crack, most commonly on vehicles in warm climates and exposed to a lot of sunlight. The common repair is to replace the upper instrument trim panel. Information on a technical service bulletin or extended warranty is not available at this time.

The fuel pump may fail causing engine to stall and not restart.

Various issues with the electric power steering system may develop and could require replacement of steering column assembly.

The Anti-lock brake system (ABS) control unit may fail internally causing the ABS warning light to illuminate.

The distributor may develop internal faults. This can cause a rough running engine or stalling condition, the Check Engine Light may or may not illuminate. Our technicians tell us that the distributor should be overhauled or replaced to correct this concern.

The fuel gauge may not read correctly and/or the Check Engine Light may illuminate with code P0455/P0461 stored for a fuel level sensor issue. These faults may be caused by a fuel vapor line inside the fuel take interfering with the fuel level sensor. If this is found to be the case, repositioned and securing the vapor line should correct this concern. If no fault is found with the fuel vapor line, the fuel level sensor itself may be at fault.

The speedometer or other instrument panel gauge may begin to work erratically at times. Our technicians tell us that the instrument cluster must be sent to a repair facility to correct this fault. The warranty has been extended on some of these units to 7 years or 70,000 miles.

The fuel level sensor in the fuel tank may fail causing erratic fuel gauge operation. Our technicians tell us that on high mileage vehicles you may wish to replace the complete fuel pump module assembly if this condition occurs.

On certain 2005 - 2007 vehicles, General Motors has provided a special service policy covering the fuel level sensor, agreeing to pay 50% of the repair cost. This coverage extends for 10 years or 120,000 miles from the original "in service" date of the vehicle. Please contact your local GM dealer for more information.

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Our technicians recommend having the timing belt replaced at 60,000 miles. They also recommend inspecting the water pump for coolant leaks while servicing the timing belt. If the water pump shows signs of leakage it should be replaced at this time.

The alternator may fail, causing a "no charge" condition. An internal bearing may also fail and cause an abnormal noise. If the vehicle is driven too long with a failed bearing, the alternator may stop turning, which can cause the serpentine belt to break or the engine to stall and not turn over.

A clicking noise may be noted from the turn signal flasher after the turn signals are switched off.  This is commonly cause by a faulty turn signal switch which will require replacement.