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Cadillac Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems for 26 Cadillac models based on complaints from actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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Known Problems

The powertrain control module (PCM) can fail causing stalling, and various engine and transmission drivability concerns.

The powertrain control module (PCM) can fail causing stalling, and various engine and transmission drivability concerns.

Brake fluid can become dirty and may cause problems in the brake system; it should be flushed every 60,000 miles.

Brake fluid can become dirty and may cause problems in the brake system; it should be flushed every 60,000 miles.

Brake fluid can become dirty and may cause problems in the brake system; it should be flushed every 60,000 miles.

Brake fluid can become dirty and may cause problems in the brake system; it should be flushed every 60,000 miles.

Our technicians highly recommend that the engine coolant be replaced every 30,000 miles.
Our technicians highly recommend that the engine coolant be replaced every 30,000 miles.

The steering gear may fail causing a loss of power steering fluid as a result the steering may become hard to turn.

The water pump may develop a coolant leak resulting in an engine overheating condition.

 

Our technicians recommend flushing the brake fluid every 60,000 miles.  Brake fluid that is dirty may cause problems in the brake system.

Our technicians recommend flushing the brake fluid every 60,000 miles.  Brake fluid that is dirty may cause problems in the brake system.

An automatic transmission fluid leak may develop from the rubber section of a transmission cooler line. In some cases the rubber section of hose can be replaced. In others, the complete cooler line must be replaced to correct this type of leak.

An automatic transmission fluid leak may develop from the rubber section of a transmission cooler line. In some cases the rubber section of hose can be replaced. In others, the complete cooler line must be replaced to correct this type of leak.

The front struts may show signs of wear, or be excessively bouncy ride at freeway speeds. This may begin to occur at around 75,000 miles.