Buick Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems with the Buick as reported by actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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Known Problems

The front struts may show signs of wear, or be excessively bouncy ride at freeway speeds. This may begin to occur at around 75,000 miles.

The Engine Control Module (ECM) can fail causing stalling, and engine and transmission drivability concerns.

The fuel pump may fail causing engine to stall and not restart.

The transmission pressure control solenoid may fail causing erratic shifting. Our technicians tell us that partial dis-assembly of the transmission is necessary to replace a failed pressure control solenoid.

The ignition switch may fail causing a no start condition. This is not generally a theft system (passlock) issue because the security light does not illuminate or flash.

Failure of the crankshaft position sensorignition control module, or powertrain control module (PCM) may cause the Check Engine Light to illuminate.

The high pressure power steering hose will commonly leak fluid; it should be replaced.

The intake manifold gasket may develop and external engine oil or coolant leak. In some cases, an internal coolant leak may occur causing coolant to mix with the engine oil. Our technicians tell us that operating the engine  with a coolant/oil mix can result in internal engine damage. Replacing the intake manifold gasket should correct these leaks.

Problems with the anti-theft systems using the raised-chip key can prevent the car from starting. The wires in the steering column to the ignition lock cylinder tend to break. The the key and ignition lock cylinder must be replaced to correct this condition.

The intake manifold gasket may develop external engine oil and/or coolant leak. The intake manifold will need to be removed and the gasket replaced to correct this issue.

Vehicles with certain V6 engines may illuminate the Check Engine Light one or more of the following codes: P0011, P0014, P0021, P0024, P0341, P0346, P0336, or P0391. Our technicians tell us that some vehicles may require a powertrain control module (PCM) software update to correct this issue. Other vehicles may have excess camshaft end play on one or both cylinder heads which will need to be corrected using special procedures outlined by GM.