Audi Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems with the Audi as reported by actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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244
Known Problems

The flywheel for the 2006-2009 Audi TT 2.0L Turbo is a non-conventional "Dual Mass" flywheel. It is known to make light rattling noise when the engine is cold, and should subside once the engine temperature raises. If the rattle doesn't go away when the engine warms, the flywheel may have failed.

If the dual mass flywheel has failed, the only solution is to replace the flywheel.

The flywheel for the 2006-2008 Audi A4 2.0L Turbo is a non-conventional "Dual Mass" flywheel. It is known to make light rattling noise when the engine is cold, and should subside once the engine temperature raises. If the rattle doesn't go away when the engine warms, the flywheel may have failed.

If the dual mass flywheel has failed, the only solution is to replace the flywheel.

The flywheel for the 2006-2008 Audi A3 2.0L Turbo is a non-conventional "Dual Mass" flywheel. It is known to make light rattling noise when the engine is cold, and should subside once the engine temperature raises. If the rattle doesn't go away when the engine warms, the flywheel may have failed.

If the dual mass flywheel has failed, the only solution is to replace the flywheel.

The engine in the 2006-2008 Audi A3 uses direct injection which requires very high fuel pressure. This high fuel pressure is achieved by using a high pressure mechanical fuel pump (HPFP) that is driven off of the camshaft.

The HPFP may fail due to damage from a defective camshaft. The defect causes abnormal wear of the mechanical barrier between the camshaft and the fuel pump. This barrier, the cam follower, will wear down and cause failure of the camshaft and the HPFP.

Symptoms include illumination of the check engine light, engine running roughly, and loss of power. Engine codes associated may be P0300, P0301, P0302, P0303, P0304, P0087, P1093 and P2293.

To correct this issue one or all of the following will need replacement: the camshaft, high-pressure fuel pump, and/or the cam follower.

To help prevent this issue from occurring, the cam follower should be inspected every 10,000 - 15,000 miles. 

2.0L turbo charged engines may develop a hesitation on acceleration and/or illumination of the Check Engine Light due to a failed high pressure fuel pump or a worn camshaft follower or camshaft. Our technicians tell us that whenever the high pressure fuel pump is replaced the camshaft and the follower should be checked for wear. The camshaft lobe pushes on the follower to operate the high pressure fuel pump. Frequent oil changes and use of synthetic oil may help with this wear issue.

A fluid leak may develop from the propeller shaft seal on the rear of the transmission. Our technicians tell us that replacing the seal will commonly correct this concern.

A problem with the torque converter can cause the Check Engine Light to illuminate.

Clogged drains can allow rainwater to accumulate in the plenum tray (at the base of the windshield). The water may leak into the vehicle's interior, brake booster, or electrical components, which can lead to major problems. Our technicians recommend keeping the tray clear of leaves, pine needles, and other debris.

Clogged drains can allow rainwater to accumulate in the plenum tray (at the base of the windshield). The water may leak into the vehicle's interior, brake booster, or electrical components, which can lead to major problems. Our technicians recommend keeping the tray clear of leaves, pine needles, and other debris.

Clogged drains can allow rainwater to accumulate in the plenum tray (at the base of the windshield). The water may leak into the vehicle's interior, brake booster, or electrical components, which can lead to major problems. Our technicians recommend keeping the tray clear of leaves, pine needles, and other debris.

Clogged drains can allow rainwater to accumulate in the plenum tray (at the base of the windshield). The water may leak into the vehicle's interior, brake booster, or electrical components, which can lead to major problems. Our technicians recommend keeping the tray clear of leaves, pine needles, and other debris.

Our technicians recommend having the constant velocity (CV) boots and CV joints inspected at each service. Servicing torn CV boots early can prevent the need to replace the CV half shaft or CV joint.

Various bushings—located around the subframe, suspension, and steering—deteriorate with age. A clunking noise when driving over bumps, accelerating, or stopping may be a sign of worn bushings.

Fuel quality must be maintained to avoid engine misfire problems; the misfires may cause the Check Engine Light to illuminate.

Rear air springs (bellows) may develop leaks, which causes the air pump to run more often to maintain ride height. Our technicians recommend that leaking air springs be replaced.