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Car Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common car problems based on complaints from actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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Known Problems

From 2006-2016, the Volvo XC70  was built with a six-speed automatic transmission built by a third-party manufacturer, as is the case with most transmissions. For this specific automatic transmission, there is a common complaint regarding the harshness of shifts, as well as slight slippage when the transmission is hot.

In most cases, these issues arise from faulty software, which does not account for all variables as the transmission warms to normal operating temperature. In other cases, the valve body or shift solenoids are found to be faulty.

Software updates and software patches have been developed for these transmissions, and that is normally sufficient to correct drivability issues. If resetting the transmission controller and updating the transmission proves insufficient to correct concerns, the transmission will likely require rebuild or replacement before performance is returned to normal.

These transmissions were built and sold as ‘sealed for life’, but many have found that the automatic transmission fluid is not reliable for the complete service life of the vehicle. 

 

The 6-speed automatic transmission used in the 2006-2016 Volvo S60 is known for issues with harsh shifting, especially while the transmission is slightly warmer than normal operating temperature.

This is accompanied by slight transmission slippage, and is common with this transmission in various makes and models.

The transmission software sometimes causes the slipping and harsh shifts, but in other cases the valve body or shift solenoids are to blame.

To remedy the situation, the manufacturer of the transmission has issues various software updates, but in some cases a valve body replacement or transmission rebuild is required. 

 

The 6-speed automatic transmission used in the 2005-2014 Volvo XC90 is known for issues with harsh shifting, especially while the transmission is slightly warmer than normal operating temperature.

This is accompanied by slight transmission slippage, and is common with this transmission in various makes and models.

The transmission software sometimes causes the slipping and harsh shifts, but in other cases the valve body is to blame. Also, since the transmission is sealed for life, the transmission fluid may beak down and cause these issues. 

To remedy the situation, the manufacturer of the transmission has issues various software updates, but in some cases a valve body replacement or transmission rebuild is required. 

 

The Mazda CX-9 is known to have issues with hard shifts and transmission slippage on models equipped with the six speed automatic transmission. When the transmission gets warm, the issues is most noticeable as a hesitation to shift, followed by jerking or jolting into the next gear. These issues are not typically observed in combination with the check engine light

The hard shifting and transmission slipping is commonly a result of software inadequacies, which do not account for all variables as the transmission heats to normal operating conditions. In some cases, the automatic transmission may be suffering from a damaged valve body or faulty shift solenoids.

Software updates from the manufacturer of this transmission have solved many reported complaints, but not all. In cases where software updates to the transmission controller have failed, the transmission will likely need valve body replacement, shift solenoid testing and replacement, or even a complete rebuild. Since the transmission is sealed for life, the fluid is not normally considered a suspected cause, but many technicians recommend changing the transmission specific automatic transmission fluid at normal intervals. 

 

Model years 2007-2012 of the Mazda CX-7 using the 6-speed automatic transmission have been known to produce hard shifting and transmission slippage between gears. This is most noticeable when the transmission is hot, but can happen at any time. Note, this transmission is designed to be ‘sealed for life’ meaning the transmission fluid is never meant to be changed.

As many drivers and owners have learned, the issues are caused by problematic software for the transmission or mechanical failures associated with the transmission valve body or shift solenoids.

In order to restore transmission performance while shifting, the manufacturer of the transmission has issued several software updates that should correct the shifting issues. If hard shifts and slippage still exist after the software updates are completed, the transmission must be removed, disassembled, inspected and repaired.

Some technicians have advised replacing transmission fluid at normal intervals, but the manufacturer guidance is to use the original transmission fluid for the entire service life of the vehicle. 

 

A well-documented and well-known issue with the Mazda 6 built between 2005-2012 is harsh shifting from the 6-speed automatic transmission, and slight slippage between gears. This has been noted as hesitation to accelerate, especially from a stop.

Mainly, software issues have been to blame for these mishaps, but mechanical malfunctions related to shift solenoids and the valve body have also been major causes. Finally, the automatic transmissions in these models are sold as ‘sealed for life’, yet the transmission fluid does not seem to last the complete service life of the vehicle.

Correction of these issues often requires a simple software update, meaning the vehicle only needs to be plugged in, and the transmission controller receives new programming meant to fix these drivability concerns. In cases where this does not correct concerns, the transmission must be removed, inspected, and repaired, possibly requiring a complete rebuild.

To mitigate these issues from escalating to a full transmission rebuild, many technicians recommend replacing the transmission fluid at regular intervals, yet the manufacturer has never offered this guidance. 

From 2012 and up, the Land Rover Range Rover Evoque was built with a six-speed automatic transmission built by a third-party manufacturer, as is the case with most transmissions. For this specific automatic transmission, there is a common complaint regarding the harshness of shifts, as well as slight slippage when the transmission is hot.

In most cases, these issues arise from faulty software, which does not account for all variables as the transmission warms to normal operating temperature. In other cases, the valve body or shift solenoids are found to be faulty.

Software updates and software patches have been developed for these transmissions, and that is normally sufficient to correct drivability issues. If resetting the transmission controller and updating the transmission proves insufficient to correct concerns, the transmission will likely require rebuild or replacement before performance is returned to normal.

These transmissions were built and sold as ‘sealed for life’, but many have found that the automatic transmission fluid is not reliable for the complete service life of the vehicle. 

While driving the Land Rover Freelander 2, operators may notice harsh shifting or slippage of the transmission.

This is caused by software issues in many cases, however, internal transmission failure may be the culprit as well. In some instances, the failure has been attributed to the ‘sealed-for-life’ nature of the transmission, as the transmission fluid may break down before the transmission is taken out of service.

The manufacturer of the transmission, which is a third party, has issued many software updates, but when these updates fail to correct concerns, the transmission must be removed, disassembled, inspected, and repaired. 

While driving the Mazda MPV, operators may notice harsh shifting or slippage of the transmission. It is important to note that the check engine warning light will likely not illuminate. 

This is caused by software issues in many cases, however, internal transmission failure may be the culprit as well. In some instances, the failure has been attributed to the ‘sealed-for-life’ nature of the transmission, as the transmission fluid may break down before the transmission is taken out of service.

 

The manufacturer of the transmission, which is a third party, has issued many software updates, but when these updates fail to correct concerns, the transmission must be removed, disassembled, inspected, and repaired. 

The Jaguar X-Type produced between 2007-2009 is known to have issues with hard shifts and transmission slippage on models equipped with the six speed automatic transmission. When the transmission gets warm, the issues is most noticeable as a hesitation to shift, followed by jerking or jolting into the next gear.

The hard shifting and transmission slipping is commonly a result of software inadequacies, which do not account for all variables as the transmission heats to normal operating conditions. In some cases, the automatic transmission may be suffering from a damaged valve body or faulty shift solenoids.

 

Software updates from the manufacturer of this transmission have solved many reported complaints, but not all. In cases where software updates to the transmission controller have failed, the transmission will likely need valve body replacement, shift solenoid testing and replacement, or even a complete rebuild.

Since the transmission is sealed for life, the fluid is not normally considered a suspected cause, but many technicians recommend changing the transmission specific automatic transmission fluid at normal intervals. 

Model years 2007-2012 of the Hyundai Veracruz using the 6-speed automatic transmission have been known to produce hard shifting and transmission slippage between gears, thought the check engine light may not illuminate. This is most noticeable when the transmission is hot, but can happen at any time. Note, this transmission is designed to be ‘sealed for life’ meaning the transmission fluid is never meant to be changed.

As many drivers and owners have learned, the issues are caused by problematic software for the transmission or mechanical failures associated with the transmission valve body or shift solenoids.

In order to restore transmission performance while shifting, the manufacturer of the transmission has issued several software updates that should correct the shifting issues. If hard shifts and slippage still exist after the software updates are completed, the transmission must be removed, disassembled, inspected and repaired.

 

Some technicians have advised replacing transmission fluid at normal intervals, but the manufacturer guidance is to use the original transmission fluid for the entire service life of the vehicle. 

A well-documented and well-known issue with the Saab 9-3 built between 2003-2011 is harsh shifting from the 6-speed automatic transmission, and slight slippage between gears. This has been noted as hesitation to accelerate, especially from a stop.

Mainly, software issues have been to blame for these mishaps, but mechanical malfunctions related to shift solenoids and the valve body have also been major causes. Finally, the automatic transmissions in these models are sold as ‘sealed for life’, yet the transmission fluid does not seem to last the complete service life of the vehicle.

Correction of these issues often requires a simple software update, meaning the vehicle only needs to be plugged in, and the transmission controller receives new programming meant to fix these drivability concerns. In cases where this does not correct concerns, the transmission must be removed, inspected, and repaired, possibly requiring a complete rebuild.  

 

To mitigate these issues from escalating to a full transmission rebuild, many technicians recommend replacing the transmission fluid at regular intervals, yet the manufacturer has never offered this guidance. 

The Chevrolet Cruze is built with a six-speed automatic transmission built by a third-party manufacturer, as is the case with most transmissions. For this specific automatic transmission, there is a common complaint regarding the harshness of shifts, as well as slight slippage when the transmission is hot.

In most cases, these issues arise from faulty software, which does not account for all variables as the transmission warms to normal operating temperature. In other cases, the valve body or shift solenoids are found to be faulty.

Software updates and software patches have been developed for these transmissions, and that is normally sufficient to correct drivability issues. If resetting the transmission controller and updating the transmission proves insufficient to correct concerns, the transmission will likely require rebuild or replacement before performance is returned to normal.

These transmissions were built and sold as ‘sealed for life’, but many have found that the automatic transmission fluid is not reliable for the complete service life of the vehicle. 

The 6-speed automatic transmission used in the Mercury Montego from 2005-2007 is known for issues with harsh shifting, especially while the transmission is slightly warmer than normal operating temperature. This is accompanied by slight transmission slippage, and is common with this transmission in various makes and models.

The transmission software sometimes causes the slipping and harsh shifts, but in other cases the valve body is to blame.

 

To remedy the situation, the manufacturer of the transmission has issues various software updates, but in some cases a valve body replacement or transmission rebuild is required. 

While driving the Ford Five-Hundred, operators may notice harsh shifting or slippage of the transmission. This may not illuminate the check engine light

This is caused by software issues in many cases, however, internal transmission failure may be the culprit as well. In some instances, the failure has been attributed to the ‘sealed-for-life’ nature of the transmission, as the transmission fluid may break down before the transmission is taken out of service.

 

The manufacturer of the transmission, which is a third party, has issued many software updates, but when these updates fail to correct concerns, the transmission must be removed, disassembled, inspected, and repaired. 

The Mercury Milan from 2005-2010 is known to have issues with hard shifts and transmission slippage on models equipped with the six speed automatic transmission. When the transmission gets warm, the issues is most noticeable as a hesitation to shift, followed by jerking or jolting into the next gear.

The hard shifting and transmission slipping is commonly a result of software inadequacies, which do not account for all variables as the transmission heats to normal operating conditions. In some cases, the automatic transmission may be suffering from a damaged valve body or faulty shift solenoids.

 

Software updates from the manufacturer of this transmission have solved many reported complaints, but not all. In cases where software updates to the transmission controller have failed, the transmission will likely need valve body replacement, shift solenoid testing and replacement, or even a complete rebuild.

Since the transmission is sealed for life, the fluid is not normally considered a suspected cause, but many technicians recommend changing the transmission specific automatic transmission fluid at normal intervals. 

Model years 2007-2012 of the Lincoln MKZ using the 6-speed automatic transmission have been known to produce hard shifting and transmission slippage between gears. This is most noticeable when the transmission is hot, but can happen at any time. Note, this transmission is designed to be ‘sealed for life’ meaning the transmission fluid is never meant to be changed.

As many drivers and owners have learned, the issues are caused by problematic software for the transmission or mechanical failures associated with the transmission valve body or shift solenoids.

In order to restore transmission performance while shifting, the manufacturer of the transmission has issued several software updates that should correct the shifting issues. If hard shifts and slippage still exist after the software updates are completed, the transmission must be removed, disassembled, inspected and repaired.

 

Some technicians have advised replacing transmission fluid at normal intervals, but the manufacturer guidance is to use the original transmission fluid for the entire service life of the vehicle. 

A well-documented and well-known issue with the Lincoln Zephyr is harsh shifting from the 6-speed automatic transmission, and slight slippage between gears. This has been noted as hesitation to accelerate, especially from a stop.

Mainly, software issues have been to blame for these mishaps, but mechanical malfunctions related to shift solenoids and the valve body have also been major causes. Finally, the automatic transmissions in these models are sold as ‘sealed for life’, yet the transmission fluid does not seem to last the complete service life of the vehicle.

Correction of these issues often requires a simple software update, meaning the vehicle only needs to be plugged in, and the transmission controller receives new programming meant to fix these drivability concerns. In cases where this does not correct concerns, the transmission must be removed, inspected, and repaired, possibly requiring a complete rebuild.

To mitigate these issues from escalating to a full transmission rebuild, many technicians recommend replacing the transmission fluid at regular intervals, yet the manufacturer has never offered this guidance.

From 2006-2012, the Ford Fusion was built with a six-speed automatic transmission built by a third-party manufacturer, as is the case with most transmissions.

For this specific automatic transmission, there is a common complaint regarding the harshness of shifts, as well as slight slippage when the transmission is hot.

In most cases, these issues arise from faulty software, which does not account for all variables as the transmission warms to normal operating temperature. In other cases, the valve body or shift solenoids are found to be faulty.

Software updates and software patches have been developed for these transmissions, and that is normally sufficient to correct drivability issues. If resetting the transmission controller and updating the transmission proves insufficient to correct concerns, the transmission will likely require rebuild or replacement before performance is returned to normal.

These transmissions were built and sold as ‘sealed for life’, but many have found that the automatic transmission fluid is not reliable for the complete service life of the vehicle.

The 6-speed automatic transmission used in the BMW i8 from 2014-2017 is known for issues with harsh shifting, especially while the transmission is slightly warmer than normal operating temperature.

This is accompanied by slight transmission slippage, and is common with this transmission in various makes and models. Note that the check engine light does not typically illuminate due to these concerns.

The transmission software sometimes causes the slipping and harsh shifts, but in other cases the valve body is to blame.

To remedy the situation, the manufacturer of the transmission has issues various software updates, but in some cases a valve body replacement or transmission rebuild is required.

Crankshaft  and  camshaft  position sensors can leak oil into the connector causing  Check Engine Light  illumination. The engine may also stall as a result. Leaking sensors should be replaced. Certain 2002 models were recalled for a separate camshaft and crankshaft sensor issue. For more information on the recall please click  here»

As vehicles age, various problems may develop with the hard and soft tops. If problems are encountered, it would be recommended to have a technician familiar with these tops perform the diagnoses.

In warm weather, the power sliding door switch may get stuck in the open position. Kia has an improved switch to correct this problem.

An oil leak from the oil filter adapter may be evident. Chrysler has made a revised oil filter adapter is available.

The Check Engine Light may illuminate due to a defective charcoal canister vent control valve. The charcoal canister is a component in the Evaporative emissions (EVAP) system.  Our technicians tell us a failed vent valve will require replacement.

The original alternator was incapable of supplying sufficient power to the battery when the engine was idling with electrical loads (lights, air conditioning). A new, more powerful alternator and reprogramming of the powertrain computer will commonly correct this problem.

The Airbag (SRS) warning light may illuminate due to one or more failed sensors. Our technicians recommend complete diagnoses of any stored fault codes because these sensors can be very expensive to replace.

Check Engine Light illumination—combined with a lack of power or a stumble on acceleration—may be caused by the throttle position switch (TPS). Kia released an improved part which should correct this concern.