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Car Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common car problems based on complaints from actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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14,618
Known Problems
Due to corrosion at the pivot, the driver side window wiper may fail. The pivot must be replaced.
An improperly-seated connection on the starter (coming from the battery) may cause the engine not to crank. Plastic must be ground off the cable terminal so it can sit flat and flush.
Worn seals inside the transmission may cause problems with upshifting and downshifting in automatic transmissions.
AWD-equipped vehicles can show a wide range of transmission problems; usually, the wrong-sized tires are being used. Be sure that all the tires are the same and that all four are replaced at the same time. Dodge recommends tire rotation every 7,500 miles.
During turning, squeaks can come from the strut area; the strut mount assembly should be replaced.
Windows may not roll up or down, resulting in a "ratcheting" noise. This is often caused by the plastic ribbon gear (flex tracks) on the regulator that breaks. Flex tracks are easily replaced by removing the door trim panel.
Delayed and/or erratic shifting can be caused by the transmission kick-down cable sticking. Since the oil pan has to be removed to replace the cable, have the shop replace the transmission filter at the same time
A rattling noise from under the vehicle can be caused by a loose exhaust header pipe heat shield.
Although a high rate of engine-related fires have been reported with this engine, most can be attributed to neglected maintenance. The fuel hoses in the engine compartment should be inspected periodically.
In areas of the country with a high amount of precipitation (or in vehicles with rust on the lower passenger side windscreen), water can leak into the automatic transmission computer. This will illuminate a transmission failure light on the control panel and cause the transmission to shift erratically.
The release arm for the throw out bearing can bind and cause problems with the clutch. Flywheel wear can cause driving and shifting problems and may cause the hubs to fail.
The front hood and rear deck lid support struts may fail; replacement is required.
Issues with the air flow meter flap or calibration can cause fuel mixture control problems.
Aged and deteriorated connectors can cause common wiring issues; repair requires care and vehicle-specific information.
Erratic switches and controls can cause electrical problems.
Due to electrical interference from cell phones and secondary ignition faults, the vehicle's central warning system display can be erratic.
The tire pressure monitoring system may have problems.
The front hood and rear deck lid support struts may fail; replacement is required.
Pay close attention to warning lights and have the brakes inspected regularly—immediately address any brake problems. Hard driving habits will cause excessive brake pad and rotor wear.
Moisture accumulation within instruments can be traced to small leaks at the windshield and can usually be resolved without removing the glass.
The vehicle central warning display can be sensitive to interference from vehicle ignition faults such as high voltage arcing anywhere in system. Battery capacity must be adequate to avoid electrical issues; also, the battery must be maintained and checked regularly.
Using the wrong battery or the failure of a climate control module may cause a chronic dead battery after the vehicle has not been used for a while.
The spur gear drive area is prone to leaks; the seals/gaskets can be replaced without removing the transmission. 
The hydraulic components for the clutch release mechanism at the clutch pedal can fail and cause a low, limp pedal feel.
The dual mass flywheel can fail and cause symptoms like noise and chatter when operating the clutch and changing gears.
Tire wear (especially in the rear tires) can be rapid and handling will suffer if the problem is not addressed.
Fluid leaks at the right rear corner can often be traced to the radial seal at the power steering pump.
The front control arms should be regularly inspected for wear at the ball joints and bushings. Ball joint boot cracks/tears can lead to ball joint wear and failure.
In order to avoid ABS, Tiptronic, or intermediate differential faults/warning lights, correct tire profile and wear must be maintained.
A failing cylinder head temperature sensor can cause erratic running or the engine to cut out entirely.