Car Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems as reported by actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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15,029
Known Problems

A Loose or worn gas cap may cause Check Engine Light to illuminate.

Temperature blend and recirculation doors commonly fail, which can cause the AC modes not to change or the temperature to be different on the left and right sides. If replacing blend air doors, a recirculation door, a door link, or a sub-assembly housing, new heating, ventilation and AC (HVAC) sub-assemblies are available that improve reliability.

One or more of the power door locks may become inoperative. Our technicians tell us that modifications to the door hardware and door panel may be necessary to correct this issue.


Long cranking times in cold temperatures (below freezing) may be solved with a software update to the Cummins ECM.

The front oxygen (air fuel ratio) sensor element may develop a crack, causing the Check Engine Light to illuminate. Subaru has recalled certain models to replace sensors that may fail. The Subaru service program number is WXW-80, this is not a government mandated recall.

Poor quality low speed transmission shifting may be noted. Our technicians tell us updated transmission software is available which may correct this concern.

Nissan issued a recall on the fuel pump for premature failure. There was an owner notification program and labels were placed on the fuel pump access panel and next to the AC charge label in the engine compartment.

The exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) tube which connects the EGR valve to the intake manifold may develop an engine vacuum leak, causing the Check Engine Light to illuminate with code P0171 and/or P0174 stored.

The thermostat may fail to close completely, causing the Check Engine Light to illuminate. This problem will prevent the engine from reaching normal operating temperature; a new thermostat should be installed.

The tachometer sensor may fail; if the tachometer needle jumps around and the transmission has harsh shifts or does not upshift, this sensor should be checked. This sensor is mounted in a cover at the front of the motor.

A Loose or worn gas cap may cause Check Engine Light to illuminate.

A Loose or worn gas cap may cause Check Engine Light to illuminate.

Various issues with the electric power steering system may develop and could require replacement of steering column assembly.

If the engine will not crank over, the most common problem is the starter. These will tend to go out at about 100,00-125,000 miles. Sometimes it is only the starter solenoid, but often the complete starter (including solenoid) needs to be replaced.

The distributor shaft bearing can become rusty, and seize causing the engine to stall or not start. The failed distributor will commonly require replacement.

The engine oil pan gasket can develop a leak. Leaking oil may accumulate on the exhaust system resulting in a burning smell. Replacing the gasket should correct this leak.

The ignition module or an ignition coil may fail causing an engine misfire, the Check Engine Light may or may not illuminate. Diagnoses will be required to determine the cause and needed repair.

The power door lock actuators may become slow to operate or stop working completely and require replacement.

Dodge issued a recall for fuel leaks. Dealers will reinforce the fuel rail to prevent cracking and replace the O-ring seals on the fuel rail and fuel injectors.

The composite (plastic) intake manifold may crack near the thermostat housing and cause a coolant leak. Ford released an updated manifold that was reinforced to prevent a recurrence. No recall was issued for this problem but Ford did extend the warranty to seven years on some models from the date of purchase.

The ignition coil inside the distributor may fail. Our technicians tell us this may result in a hesitation on acceleration, especially when the vehicle is warming up on cold, rainy days. The pickup coils inside the distributor can also fail and cause a no-start condition. There have also been some failures of the radio noise suppressors inside the distributors, which can short out. Our technicians recommend replacing the whole distributor with a complete, genuine Toyota distributor if any of its components fail.

The automatic transmission shifter may fail causing the ignition key to become stuck in the ignition lock cylinder.

The anti-lock brake system (ABS) front wheel speed sensors are prone to failure. When a sensor fails, the ABS warning light may illuminate and/or the ABS system may activate erratically.

The engine mount on the right side can wear prematurely and cause excessive engine movement.

The serpentine belt tensioner can fail; it may become noisy and/or the belt may jump off. Replacement of the failed tensioner will be necessary.