Car Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems as reported by actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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Known Problems

One or more heater & AC (HVAC) air delivery and/or temperature mode door actuator may fail. This can result in incorrect air delivery or temperature. If this occurs, fault code(s) stored in the HVAC control module should be available to assist with diagnoses.

A binding fuel filler cap can cause the Check Engine Light to illuminate. Our technicians tell us this can be caused by a problem with the fuel filler neck which may require replacement.

A Loose or worn gas cap may cause Check Engine Light to illuminate.

The fuel pump electrical relay sometimes stops working.

The composite (plastic) intake manifold may crack near the thermostat housing and cause a coolant leak. Ford released an updated manifold that was reinforced to prevent a recurrence. No recall was issued for this problem but Ford did extend the warranty to seven years on some models from the date of purchase.

The distributor may develop internal faults. This can cause a rough running engine or stalling condition, the Check Engine Light may or may not illuminate. Our technicians tell us that the distributor should be overhauled or replaced to correct this concern.

Reprogramming the transmission control module with the latest Kia transmission software may fix abnormalities in the automatic transmission and erroneous transmission-related Check Engine Light illumination. Software updates are commonly most effective on newer vehicles. Higher mileage vehicles may exhibit a similar symptom caused by a component failure. However, whenever major transmission repairs are performed the transmission software should be checked and updated as necessary.

On vehicles equipped with rear air springs, the air compressor may fail causing the rear suspension to sit low.

Valve cover gasket leaks are common after 60,000 miles. Symptoms will include oil drips under the vehicle and burning oil smell from the engine compartment.

A knock or clunk type noise may be noted from the front suspension over bumps. This is can caused by worm stabilizer (sway) bar links. Replacing both stabilizer bar links will commonly repair this issue.

A single click or pop may be heard from the rear of the vehicle when the clutch is released. Our technicians tell us the repair involves installing matched hubs and yokes to the rear axle.

Headlight switches can fail, causing the headlights to intermittently stay in the on or off position. Repeatedly turning the switch on and off may temporarily fix the problem. Replacement of the switch is needed to resolve this issue. 

Nissan issued a recall on the fuel pump for premature failure. There was an owner notification program and labels were placed on the fuel pump access panel and next to the AC charge label in the engine compartment.

The transmission pressure control solenoid may fail causing erratic shifting. Our technicians tell us that partial dis-assembly of the transmission is necessary to replace a failed pressure control solenoid.

The EGR tube may develop an engine vacuum leak causing the engine to run lean. The Check Engine Light may or may not illuminate.

At higher mileages, (125,000-150,000) the automatic transmission may not shift correctly. This can be caused by the throttle position sensor being out of adjustment or a shift solenoid needing to be replaced. Typically the transmission does not need to be completely overhauled.

The crankshaft angle sensor or the camshaft position sensor can fail and cause loss of engine power, an engine that cuts out, and other drivability problems. This will cause the Check Engine Light to illuminate. Certain models have been involved in a recall to replace the camshaft and crankshaft sensors. For more information on this recall, please click here»

Bulletin 13N02 - This program extends the coverage of the brake booster to ten years of service or 150,000 miles from the warranty start of the vehicle, whichever occurs first. This is a one time repair program.

In some of the affected vehicles, it is possible for the brake booster to develop a small tear in the diaphragm under certain driving and environmental conditions. If this occurs, the driver may hear a hissing noise while depressing the pedal and may also experience a "spongy" pedal feel without a noticeable effect on braking performance. If the vehicle is not serviced, the tear will eventually expand and the pedal effort required to stop the vehicle will gradually increase. However, in all cases, the fundamental vehicle braking system remains functional.

An abnormal noise may develop from the timing chain area, Our technicians tell us it may be necessary to replace the variable valve timing camshaft shaft sprockets to correct this concern.

One or more heater & AC (HVAC) air delivery and/or temperature mode door actuator may fail. This can result in incorrect air delivery or temperature. If this occurs, fault code(s) stored in the HVAC control module should be available to assist with diagnoses.

The inside and outside door handles are prone to breaking.

A coolant leak from the radiator can be caused by a defective thermostat bypass. This can cause pressure spikes in the cooling system, which leads to radiator failure. The thermostat assembly and radiator should be replaced.

Reprogramming the transmission control module with the latest Kia transmission software may fix abnormalities in the automatic transmission and erroneous transmission-related Check Engine Light illumination. Software updates are commonly most effective on newer vehicles. Higher mileage vehicles may exhibit a similar symptom caused by a component failure. However, whenever major transmission repairs are performed the transmission software should be checked and updated as necessary.

Leaks at the front and/or rear differential pinion seal and from the transfer case are common. Low fluid level in the differential or transfer case can result in bearing failure. Damaged bearings commonly cause a whine or growl type noise.

An ignition coil or spark plug may fail unexpectedly resulting in an engine misfire and possible illumination of the Check Engine Light. Vehicles equipped with spark plug wires may also develop a misfire caused by a failed spark plug wire.

Due to wear, high usage vehicles can experience ignition lock and tumbler failures. The ignition lock cylinder will generally require replacement to correct this concern.