1999 Mercedes-Benz E320 Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems with the 1999 Mercedes-Benz E320 as reported by actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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Known Problems

The crankshaft position sensor may fail. Symptoms of this are: The engine will crank—but not start—especially when the engine is warm. The car may start again if it is left to cool off, but it may run roughly or have poor performance.

The evaporator temperature sensor can fail, causing the AC compressor not to cycle. If the AC compressor does not turn on, the AC system will not blow cold air. If the compressor is stuck on, the air will be very cold at first, before warming up.

Failed spark plug wires and/or ignition coils can cause intermittent misfires (rough running); the Check Engine Light may also illuminate. Diagnoses of the ignition system will be necessary to determine which components are at fault.

Motor mounts commonly fail, causing engine vibrations to be transferred to the body. Failed motor mounts should be replaced in order to prevent damage to the transmission mount.

The cup holder in the center console may break.

A malfunctioning HVAC blower motor regulator can cause the blower motor to operate below the requested speed or not at all. Updated regulators are available; the blower motor and cover need to be replaced at the same time to upgrade the system.

The ESP and BAS warning lights may illuminate due to a failed brake light switch. Replacement of the failed switch should correct this concern.

PSE system, voice control module, or Tele Aid module failure can cause a lack of audio. These same modules can also cause dead battery conditions when they fail to "time out." Many electronic control modules are active even when the engine is off. If these modules stay active, they will drain the battery, which is why they have a timer built into the modules. The timer shuts down the modules after a preset amount of time (timing out). If a module does not time out, it will stay active and drain the battery.

Brake lamp housings can melt, resulting in a loss of contact for the brake light bulb holder. If this happens, the brake light will not work. Replacement of the damaged lamp housing should correct this problem.

A squeak from the steering column is often related to a rubber boot in the column or a seal in the power steering rack.

When the engine is running, but the vehicle is not moving, a rattle heard from beneath the vehicle could indicate that one of the exhaust catalytic converters has failed. The substrate (the internal part of the catalyst that reduces emissions) can loosen and bounce around inside the canister section of the converter—the defective unit will need to be replaced. If this problem is ignored, the substrate can break down and reduce to a size that plugs the outlet pipe, which will cause a sudden loss in power.

The mass air flow (MAF) sensor tends to fail. The engine air filter should be replaced when the mass air flow sensor is replaced; a dirty filter can allow debris to damage the new sensor.

Due to wear, high usage vehicles can experience ignition lock and tumbler failures. The ignition lock cylinder will generally require replacement to correct this concern.

Instrument cluster displays tend to fail, especially the clock and gear indicators. Our technicians tell us the instrument cluster will require replacement to correct this issue.