How Long Should My Car Battery Last?

We wish car batteries could talk and tell us when they’re going to die, but sadly they can’t. Your car battery is extremely important allows your vehicle to start and function. It’s important to understand the conditions of your vehicle to know the conditions of your battery and the lifecycle on that battery.

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Image courtesy of Pixabay

We wish car batteries could talk and tell us when they’re going to die, but sadly they can’t. Your car battery is extremely important allows your vehicle to start and function. It’s important to understand the conditions of your vehicle to know the conditions of your battery and the lifecycle on that battery.

Leaving your car sitting in the garage will deteriorate your car battery just as driving it every single day. Some car batteries will show signs of weakening, such as a slow crank when starting your vehicle, but more modern batteries may show no signs at all.

Most car batteries these days have a useful life of around four years and come equipped with a sticker or stamp on the face that will tell you the month and year the battery was made.

Signs of Car Battery Failure

Many batteries will show no signs of failure and simply die one day, possibly leaving you in a bind. If your battery does show signs of failure, it could range from a slow crank when starting your vehicle to electrical issues with your car.

Battery corrosion or acid leakage is also a sign of failure for car batteries. Take a look at your battery’s warranty to get a good idea of life – they usually come with a 1 to 3-year warranty, which is a sign of how long your battery is expected to last by the manufacturer.

Cost and Upkeep of a Car Battery

According to RepairPal, the average battery will run between $149 to $202 on average (including a quality battery and professional installation). We recommend a high-quality battery to ensure a longer life and a safer replacement for the more computerized vehicles on the road. You should keep your battery in good shape and inspect it often to ensure a full life.

Cleaning the battery terminals is a simple DIY anyone can do:

  1. Safety first! Remember to wear gloves and goggles.
  2. Carefully disconnect the battery, negative first and then positive.
  3. Mix a solution of 1 cup of hot water with 1 tablespoon of baking soda.
  4. Dip a toothbrush in the solution and scrub along the posts and the top of the battery.