2000 Dodge Ram Van 1500 Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems with the 2000 Dodge Ram Van 1500 as reported by actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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20
Known Problems

The AC/heater (HVAC) system may unexpectedly switch to the defrost mode when accelerating. This system is operated by engine vacuum and should be inspected for any vacuum leaks if this problem develops.  There is also a revised vacuum check valve available to address this concern.

Some automatic transmissions may set a code P1740, torque converter fault. Our technicians tell us there is a revised transmission pressure boost valve cover plate to correct this condition.

The HVAC blower may operate on high speed only. This is commonly caused by a failed blower motor resistor. Chrysler has released a revised part to address this problem.

Problems may develop with the sliding door. Our technicians tell us that there is a revised latch assembly are latch rods available to correct sliding door latch issues.
Some vehicles may exhibit one or more of the following: Spark knock complaints when the vehicle is under load, various single cylinder misfire, and surge in 4th gear (around 45 mph). Our technicians tell us that rerouting the coil and spark plug wires to minimize induction effects will commonly correct this condition. If wires must cross during the reroute procedure, they must cross at a 90 degree angle.

Leak detection pump failure can be caused by the internal diaphragm switch sticking, or in some cases, contamination from debris or carbon particles from vapor canister. If black carbon particles are present in the LDP, replace vapor canister in addition to LDP. The purge solenoid should also be checked for debris or carbon contamination and replaced as necessary. All evap system hoses are subject to cracking and splitting causing leaks, Inspect hoses carefully. In cases of contamination from carbon particles or debris, all hoses and tubes must be blown out with compressed air to remove contaminates.

On the 3.9L V6 and 5.9L V8 the engine oil leaks at the distributor can be misdiagnosed as leaks from the intake manifold seal, oil pan gasket, or rear crankshaft (rear main) seal. A revised distributor is available if oil is found inside the distributor.

On 3.9L V6 and 5.9L V8 engines, the intake manifold gasket may leak and cause increased oil consumption and a spark knock during acceleration; the gasket should be replaced.

On the 3.9L V6, 5.2L V8 and 5.9L V8 the Oil leaks commonly from the valve cover gaskets, intake manifold gaskets (front and rear), timing cover gaskets, distributor O-ring, and the rear main seal area. Using fluorescent engine oil dye can be helpful in determining the source(s) of the oil leak.

Battery acid may leak onto an ABS wiring connector which could cause corrosion or a short circuit. A revised battery tray is available to protect the wire harness. Any damaged wiring will need to be repaired as necessary.

A no crank condition may be cause by a blown starter relay fuse. If the fuse is blown and the relay circuit is not shorted to ground, our technicians tell us there is a relay and harness assembly to be installed along with a new fuse.

Our technicians tell us that there is a software upgrade for the ABS module to correct inaccurate speedometer readings.

The door glass may separate from the glass lift channel. Our technicians tell us a front door glass channel kit is available to repair the door glass. The repair involves removing the door glass from the vehicle.

The instrument cluster may work erratically at times. Our technicians tell us that the fault is commonly due to connection issues at the cluster electrical connector. There is a kit available to repair the connector and terminals.

Side and rear cargo doors may open to far. New check arm pins, bumpers, and in some cases a new check arm are available.