2006 Dodge Durango Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems with the 2006 Dodge Durango as reported by actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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20
Known Problems

On the 3.7L V6 and 4.7L V8, Water may enter the spark plug wells and cause a Check Engine (MIL) light. A seal kit for the ignition coils will prevent further water entry.

On vehicles with a 3.7L V6 and 4.7L V8, water may pass by the cowl screen (at the base of the windshield) in heavy rain or a car wash. This can cause the Check Engine Light to illuminate. A revised cowl screen may be available to fix this problem.

On the 4.7L V8 engine, the Camshaft position sensor failure can cause the engine to crank but not start or it can cause intermittent stalling. A new camshaft position sensor will be needed.

If the engine does not crank (or cranks but won't start), the wireless control module (WCM) may have locked up. This is due to static discharge through the ignition key. A revised model should be installed, but simply disconnecting the negative terminal of the battery for thirty seconds will temporarily reset the module so you can start the car.

Rerouting the ignition coil wire and spark plug wires can help solve a misfire and/or surge problem that occurs at approximately 45 mph. A service bulletin was published that outlines the specifics of the repair. It states the rerouting procedure should be performed before other repairs are done for misfires, surging or spark knock.

Some vehicles may develop a musty odor coming from the HVAC system, Dodge has issued a cleaner/disinfectant and a coating for the evaporator designed to inhibit bacterial growth.

If the transmission delays initial gear engagement after being parked overnight or longer, it may be due to a suspect transmission cooler return filter. If the transmission was recently serviced and the part number for the cooler return filter contains an "AB" suffix at the end, a new filter should be installed.

Poor AC performance or no cold air blowing from vents is commonly caused by a refrigerant leak from the AC condenser. Road debris like rocks or pebbles can damage the condenser tubes.

The thermostat may fail to close completely, causing the Check Engine Light to illuminate. This problem will prevent the engine from reaching normal operating temperature; a new thermostat should be installed.

A ticking type noise may develop, most noticeable when the engine is cold. This is commonly caused by one or more broken exhaust manifold bolts. Our technicians recommend to replace the broken bolts as needed, also the exhaust manifold gaskets should be replaced at this time.

A rough engine idle and/or engine stalling condition may develop, often associated with illumination of the Check Engine Light and an exhaust gas recirculation (ERG) fault code stored. This is commonly caused by a clogged EGR tube. The repair involves cleaning the clogged EGR tube.

A whining noise heard driving at freeway speeds (more than 55 mph) can be normal noise from the rear axle which is being transmitted through the body. A body/frame damper is available which may help with this concern.

Some transmission related Check Engine Light problems can be corrected with a software update to the Powertrain Control Module (PCM). Some repairs may also require the installation of revised parts.