1998 Dodge Durango Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems with the 1998 Dodge Durango as reported by actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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Known Problems

On vehicles with a 3.7L V6 and 4.7L V8, water may pass by the cowl screen (at the base of the windshield) in heavy rain or a car wash. This can cause the Check Engine Light to illuminate. A revised cowl screen may be available to fix this problem.

Rerouting the ignition coil wire and spark plug wires can help solve a misfire and/or surge problem that occurs at approximately 45 mph. A service bulletin was published that outlines the specifics of the repair. It states the rerouting procedure should be performed before other repairs are done for misfires, surging or spark knock.

On 3.9L V6 and 5.9L V8 engines, the intake manifold gasket may leak and cause increased oil consumption and a spark knock during acceleration; the gasket should be replaced.

If the threads strip where the front brake caliper mounts to the steering knuckle, a steering knuckle repair kit is available. A new steering knuckle is not normally necessary.

Poor AC performance or no cold air blowing from vents is commonly caused by a refrigerant leak from the AC condenser. Road debris like rocks or pebbles can damage the condenser tubes.

A ticking type noise may develop, most noticeable when the engine is cold. This is commonly caused by one or more broken exhaust manifold bolts. Our technicians recommend to replace the broken bolts as needed, also the exhaust manifold gaskets should be replaced at this time.

On the 4.7L V8 engine, the Camshaft position sensor failure can cause the engine to crank but not start or it can cause intermittent stalling. A new camshaft position sensor will be needed.

A whining noise heard driving at freeway speeds (more than 55 mph) can be normal noise from the rear axle which is being transmitted through the body. A body/frame damper is available which may help with this concern.

Engine oil leaks at the distributor can be misdiagnosed as leaks from the intake manifold seal, oil pan gasket, or rear crankshaft (rear main) seal. A revised distributor is available if oil is found inside the distributor.

External oil leaks from the valve cover gaskets, intake manifold gaskets (front or rear), and the rear crankshaft seal area are common. The rear main seal is an unlikely source. Normally, leaks in this area are from the bearing cap mating surfaces as well as the sealing surface between the oil pan and bearing cap.

Front and rear differential pinion seal leaks are common. A leaking pinion seal will require replacement.

One the 3.9L V6 and 5.9L V8 the carbon buildup on the top of the piston is common. As the buildup increases with mileage and over time, symptoms may vary from light ticking, to ticking/hammering, to hammering/knocking noises. Fuel injector cleaner often solves the problem.

The power door lock switch can short-circuit internally causing a battery drain and/or the key operated accessories to function even though the key is off. If the power door lock switch is diagnosed to be the cause, replacement of the switch should fix the concern.