1991 Chrysler New Yorker Problem Reports

Newest 1991 Chrysler New Yorker Problem Reports

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Instrument cluster gauges, panel lamps, and electric door locks may not operate, and the courtesy lamps may remain on. These faults are commonly caused by "logic lock-up" of the body control module (BCM). If this is the case the BCM should be replaced with a revised version.

Carbon buildup on the top of the piston is common. Over time this can lead to symptoms varying from light ticking to knocking noises. Performing a fuel injector cleaning procedure can often help the condition by removing some of the piston top deposits.

Vehicles may develop a start and die out condition or a transmission that defaults to second gear. Our technicians tell us that the transmission control module (TCM) may be at fault and require replacement. Our technicians tell us that if the TCM is replaced the pinion factor should be reset and the quick learn procedure performed.

Various driveability issues may be the result of low fuel pressure due to a failed check valve inside the fuel pump. If this is found to be the case the fuel pump should be replaced.

A high pitched whistle type noise may be noted from the engine at idle. The repair for this condition can include replacing the idle air control motor with an updated part.

The connector on the input and/or output speed sensors on the automatic transmission may become damaged causing intermittent loss of speed control. Our technicians tell us there are wiring repair kits available to repair this issue.

A hard or no start condition may be noted in low ambient temperatures which can be caused by corrosion at the engine coolant temperature sensor. If this is the case the coolant sensor and its pigtail should be replaced with updated parts.

A slight engine knocking noise may be noted on light acceleration after a cold start. Our technicians tell us there is powertrain control module (PCM) software update available which may correct this issue.

On higher mileage vehicles timing cover oil and coolant leaks, front crankshaft oil seal leaks, and valve cover gasket leaks are common. Our technicians recommend replacing the timing chain and gears if the timing cover is removed for resealing. It is also recommended to inspect the oil pan gasket and replace the drive belts and tensioners at this time.

A faulty transaxle input speed sensor can cause the automatic transmission to default into a "limp-in" mode. Our technicians tell us there is an updated input speed sensor available to correct this condition.

Incorrect, worn, or contaminated automatic transmission fluid can cause shifting issues, noted mostly at speeds over 40mph. Our technicians tell us that repairs to correct this condition include changing the fluid and filter, driving the vehicle for 10miles and changing the fluid a second time.

The connector on the input and/or output speed sensors on the automatic transmission may become damaged causing intermittent loss of speed control. Our technicians tell us there are wiring repair kits available to repair this issue.

Automatic transmissions can exhibit a variety of shifting and noise concerns due to failure of internal components. Our technicians tell us that due to the fact numerous updated parts are available for this transmission a complete inspection of all internal parts should be performed if the transmission is disassembled for overhaul.

The anti-lock brake (ABS) warning light may illuminate. This condition may be caused by a faulty electrical connection at the ABS system and/or warning light relays. Our technicians tell us there is a revised wiring jumper harness available to correct this concern.

A rattle may be noted from the rear brakes when driving on rough roads. If the rattle is eliminated with light brake application replacing the rear brake pads with a revised part may correct this concern.