1990 Chrysler LeBaron Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems with the 1990 Chrysler LeBaron as reported by actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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17
Known Problems

The anti-lock brake (ABS) warning lamp may illuminate with "Modulator Fault" indicated by a scan tool. This would indicate a electrical fault, commonly caused by a faulty connection. ABS connectors should be inspected for problems if this situation occurs.

A noise may develop from the rear brakes. This is most noticeable when the brakes are applied after the vehicle as set for several hours. Our technicians tell us the repair can involve replacing the rear rotors and brake pads with a revised set.

Automatic transmissions can exhibit a variety of shifting and noise concerns due to failure of internal parts. Our technicians tell us that a complete inspection of all internal parts should be performed if the transmission is disassembled for overhaul. Numerous updated part are available for this transmission.

The connector on the input and/or output speed sensors on the automatic transmission may become damaged causing intermittent loss of speed control. There are wiring repair kits available to repair this issue.

Incorrect, worn, or contaminated automatic transmission fluid can cause shifting issues, noted at speeds over 40mph. Our technicians tell us that repairs to correct this condition include changing the fluid and filter, driving the vehicle for 10miles and changing the fluid a second time.

Engine oil leaks may develop from the following areas: Valve cover gaskets, cam plugs at rear of the cylinder head, cam seals, front crankshaft seal, and the oil filter bracket. Leaking seals and gaskets should be replaced. Due to mis-machining of the mating surfaces, as special gasket is required to correct the oil filter bracket leak.

Carbon buildup on the top of the piston is common. Over time this can lead to symptoms varying from light ticking to knocking noises. Performing a fuel injector cleaning procedure can often help the condition by removing some of the piston top deposits.

The turbocharger may fail resulting in any of the following: Excessive smoke from the exhaust, lack of power, or grinding or scraping noise from the turbocharger. Our technicians tell us the most common causes of turbocharger failure are lack of oil changes, hard acceleration when the engine is cold, and lack of a cool down period are high speed driving or excessive loads.

4 cylinder engine timing belts can be affected by driving in very hot climates. Our technicians tell us that replacement should be considered before the recommended 60K interval. Replacement timing belts have been designed for greater durability. It is also recommended the belt tensioner be replaced whenever the timing belt is replaced.

4 cylinder engines may develop a cold engine knock that may last for 3-5 minutes and is often mis-diagnosed as a lifter noise. Our technicians tell us in most cases the noise is coming from the piston area and is not a reliability or durability concern.

The convertible top rear window may break for no apparent reason when the folding top is lowered. Our technicians tell us that modifying the headliner and adding a rubber shim to the folding top linkage will generally correct this issue.

Vehicles may develop a start and die out condition or a transmission that defaults to second gear. Our technicians tell us that the transmission control module (TCM) may be at fault and require replacement. If the TCM is replaced the pinion factor should be reset and the quick learn procedure performed.

3.0L engines may develop an excessive oil consumption issue. Blue oil smoke may be noted from the exhaust during deceleration conditions (high engine vacuum). Our technicians tell us that this condition can be caused by valve guides dropping out of position. Updated valve guides with a revised snap ring grove are available to correct this issue.

The front seat belts may retract slowly or not at all or may be difficult to extend, commonly caused by a mispositioned seat belt turning loop. The turning loop can be repositioned by fully extending the seat belt and jerking it sharply towards the front of the car.