2000 Cadillac Catera Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems with the 2000 Cadillac Catera as reported by actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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Known Problems

Various drivability issues and be addressed by updating the software in the engine control module (ECM).

The hot water control valve may develop a coolant leak resulting in engine overheating. A leaking valve should be replaced.

The Catera often experiences oil leaks from the oil cooler and/or valve cover gasket. The thermostat seal and/or the water pump may develop a coolant leak.

Engine vacuum leaks may develop from the various vacuum hoses causing the engine to idle incorrectly or the Check Engine Light to illuminate. Damaged vacuum lines should be replaced as necessary. Our technicians tell us that rubber vacuum hoses can be used to replace damaged plastic lines if necessary, as long as any connections are vacuum tight.

The crankshaft position sensor may fail causing the engine to stall while driving and/or will crank but not start, especially when the engine is warm. The car may start again if it is left to cool off, but it may run roughly or have poor performance.

Illumination of the Check Engine Light can be caused by a loose or worn gas cap.

The thermostat may become stuck in the open position causing the engine to warm up too slowly, setting a P0128 trouble code and causing the Check Engine Light to illuminate.

General Motors recommends that the spark plugs should be replaced every 100,000 miles. Our technicians highly recommend the spark plug wires be replaced at the same time.

The oil pressure warning light may illuminate due to a failed oil pressure sensor. Our technicians tell us that replacing the oil pressure sender will commonly correct this concern.

The timing belt idler and/or tensioner pulley may fail, resulting in server engine damage. Cadillac has recalled certain 1997-2001 models to replace the timing belt and other related components as necessary.

GM recommends replacing the engine coolant at 100,000 miles; however, our technicians tell us that the coolant may become contaminated and require a complete cooling system flush every 60,000 to 70,000 miles.

Brake fluid can become dirty and may cause problems in the brake system; it should be flushed every 60,000 miles.

On the automatic transmission models, the shift lever may not shift completely into "Park". This can result in the key being stuck in the ignition lock cylinder. Care should be taken to insure the shift lever fully engages the "Park" position. Replacing the shifter may be necessary to correct this concern.