Brakes on 2004 Chevrolet Malibu

My son-in-law took the Malibu car to have the brakes change and the brakes were change but NOT bleed. Don't they suppose to do this?

by in San Antonio, TX on March 20, 2009
3 answers 1 comment
ANSWER by on March 20, 2009
No normal repair shop would send a customer out on the road without bleeding the brake system because of the liability issue, and they're is a charge to bleed the brakes but its normally included in the brake job. Better pay someone to bleed the brake system
COMMENT by on March 20, 2009
Plus when he told them why did they not bleed the brakes they said it was extra cost. Is this every where or just where he took the car?
ANSWER by on March 20, 2009
If all they replaced were the pads or pads and rotors, you don't necessarily do a 'complete' system bleed. The proper way to push the caliper pistons back into the caliper is to crack the bleeder screw so any dirty fluid inside the caliper does not get pushed back into the hard lines. When I do brakes, that is what I do and I also crack the bleeder when the caliper is remounted with pads to see if any air bubbles come out. Once you complete the brakes replacement, fill the brake fluid reservoir to the proper line (using the correct fluid). If you're looking for them connect the pressure bleeder and replace all the fluid, then yes, that does typically cost more. That type of bleeding is done when something like the master cylinder is replaced (it is necessary), or if the fluid is very old and the customer requests a system bleed
ANSWER by on March 13, 2010
Not all shops will include "brake bleeding" the system. Doing so can cause issues on certain vehicles and most of the time it is a time consuming job, which may require more expense! -Extra labor is one of the main reason why they would charge more. Problems with the brake bleeders may occur. If the bleeders don't free up easily, then having to heat up the ends which require more time to do! The worst possible scenario, which is a comman issue with bleeders is that they don't free up and they'll break! Now the concern becomes more costly! What would you then? Would you A) replace the entire component (I.E. Wheelcylinder or Caliper) or B) tap drill the old bleeder and hope you can drill it out with out stripping the threads? In any case, both procedures will require more time and now the cost has gone up even more! Unless you frequently bleed your brakes often, you can expect these comman issues to occur! Otherwise expect to pay more!
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