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1999 Subaru Forester Question: bluish white smoke

 

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mistabigchief, San Antonio, TX, January 08, 2010, 17:40
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i have a 99 subaru forester that smokes alot when starting, changed oil, filter air filter, spark plugs and wires. the plugs are gapped to specs. (double checked) and no water in the oil. little bit of gas on the plugs when i changed them though

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  • Answer #1

    camarosx2 January 08, 2010, 20:28
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    how many miles are on it? Have you been been adding fluids(oil or coolant)

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    camarosx2, January 13, 2010, 10:12
     Rookie

    that sounds to me like excessive carbon buildup caused by short drives, see when you only drive for a few miles then the engine never has a chance to fully warm up and that will cause carbon to build up, to avoid this you will want to let your car warm up for a full 5-10 mins before leaving, no matter what the temp is and go down the highway from time to time that should really help to burn up the carbon and keep it from forming also make sure that the pcv valve is in good working order but I would definately run a 3 part fuel system cleaner through the engine, it comes in a kit including fuel tank additive, throttle body cleaner and top engine cleaner. to clean the throttle body with the engine off remove the intake boot and spray the throttle valve and inside the body itself with the cleaner from the kit also for this I like to use an old soft bristle toothbrush to help loosen the caked on carbon buildup, after that is clean reinstall the intake boot and start the engine you will need to hold the gas pedal to the floor until it starts to clear the flood that was just caused with the throttle body cleaner, next make sure you add the bottle labeled for the gas tank to the gas tank cause there is a difference between the two and for the final bottle you will need one of two different style feed devices there are two types to choose from one hooks up to a vaccum line and engine vaccum draws the treatment in and the other hooks up to shop air and the shrader valve on your cars fuel line this style is much more effective, but requires fuel pump be disabled by removing its fuse or relay and MAKE SURE THE GAS CAP IS OFF to releive pressure in the tank

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    patrick mannion from Greg Solow's Engine Room, January 09, 2010, 14:32
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    If the engine has higher mileage or perhaps not so frequent oil changes perhaps it is oil consumption due to worn valve guides or seals or just worn piston rings. These engines do blow head gaskets. The most accurate way to test for a blown head gasket on a gasoline engine is to test for the presence of carbon monoxide in the cooling system. Snap-On, Matco (part # CO 2000), and Napa sell a tool to check to carry out this test. Another link to a supplier of this tool is http://www.etoolcart.com/combustion-leak-detector-lis7550.... Carbon Monoxide is only present if there is a blown head gasket or cracked cylinder head. http://www.arrowheadradiator.com/head_gasket_or_combustio... I think the napa part number 700-1006. http://www.blockchek.com/instructions.htm . Signs of a blown head gasket are coolant loss (frequently have to top up the coolant level of the engine without seeing an obvious leak), experiencing over heating or rough engine running or the presence of white sweet smelling steam from the exhaust. A badly blown head gasket may allow engine coolant and oil to mix.

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    mistabigchief, January 13, 2010, 06:24
     Rookie

    it has 119,600 miles fluids are fine no water in the oil or vice versa. but i am noticing that it does use a bit more gas than most 4 bangers i've ever had. don't drive far or much, work and back just over a mile. i even have the records from the past owners tune ups.

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