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RepairPal Blog:

 General Interest

Gas prices? The future of hybrids? Find out what's in the news today!

These days, it seems like Do It Yourself (DIY) is everywhere, mostly because people are trying to save money any way they can. But while doing some things on your own makes sense (like painting your hallway), attempting to repair a car problem yourself can often end up costing more instead of less.

Are you one of those people who doesn't put gas into your tank until it beeps a warning? I’ve known a few people who do this on a regular basis and I’ve seen the damage first hand.

The other day, a recall was released concerning Toyota floor mats and unintended acceleration. While Toyota received a lot of bad press a year or so ago for this same issue, this new recall was mostly ignored by the news media.

In 1995, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) introduced minimum standards for all gasoline sold in the U.S. These standards included a detergent package that must be added to gasoline to help prevent the accumulation of carbon deposits, mostly on the intake valves, which can impact engine performance and emissions.

Last week, we sent out our brand new metal Top Shop signs to all of our Top Shop members. Check them out!

There are a lot of people behind the scenes at RepairPal who do wonderful and amazing things—Roy Preston is one of them. Roy is our parts expert and he spends a lot of time and effort making sure that the cost of parts in our RepairPrice Estimator are up-to-date and accurate. He has also been building and showing muscle cars for 25 years.

 As a society, we have come to trust the opinions of organizations like AAA, Consumer Reports, and Kelley Blue Book. In the automotive repair industry, having national certifications is a strong symbol of approval.  

During the regular use of your vehicle, the fluids that protect critical components wear out, causing unneeded corrosion and wear. Harmful deposits like carbon, scale, sludge, and rust sneak in and steal the vitality and life from your vehicle. But, if maintained regularly, your vehicle can exceed 200,000 miles or more without incurring expensive repair bills. 

I am sure you have all seen it, that yellow Check Engine Light (CEL). And now it’s on again, for perhaps no apparent reason. There are many different faults that can cause the CEL to turn on; each will set a different “fault code” in the engine control computer.  

For those of us who don't know very much about cars, we may hear of things like "suspension" or "emissions" and kind of understand what they are and what they do, but not really know for sure. If you want to hang with the big boys and really know your stuff, then take some time to check out our series of articles explaining the systems you find in modern vehicles.