2006 Audi A3 Problems

RepairPal has identified the most common problems with the 2006 Audi A3 as reported by actual vehicle owners. We'll tell you what the problem is and what it'll take to fix it.

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Known Problems

The engine in the 2006-2008 Audi A3 uses direct injection which requires very high fuel pressure. This high fuel pressure is achieved by using a high pressure mechanical fuel pump (HPFP) that is driven off of the camshaft.

The HPFP may fail due to damage from a defective camshaft. The defect causes abnormal wear of the mechanical barrier between the camshaft and the fuel pump. This barrier, the cam follower, will wear down and cause failure of the camshaft and the HPFP.

Symptoms include illumination of the check engine light, engine running roughly, and loss of power. Engine codes associated may be P0300, P0301, P0302, P0303, P0304, P0087, P1093 and P2293.

To correct this issue one or all of the following will need replacement: the camshaft, high-pressure fuel pump, and/or the cam follower.

To help prevent this issue from occurring, the cam follower should be inspected every 10,000 - 15,000 miles. 

A lack of power may be noted and the Check Engine Light illuminated with various throttle system fault codes stored. Our technicians tell us this is generally caused by electrical connection issues at the throttle body. If this is the case a harness repair kit is available from Audi.

2.0L turbo charged engines may develop a hesitation on acceleration and/or illumination of the Check Engine Light due to a failed high pressure fuel pump or a worn camshaft follower or camshaft. Our technicians tell us that whenever the high pressure fuel pump is replaced the camshaft and the follower should be checked for wear. The camshaft lobe pushes on the follower to operate the high pressure fuel pump. Frequent oil changes and use of synthetic oil may help with this wear issue.

An engine misfire may develop from one or more cylinders resulting in a loss of power and illumination of the Check Engine Light. Our technicians tell us that ignition coil failure is a common cause for this concern. On high mileage vehicles it may be wise to consider replacing all of the ignition coils if one fails to try and avoid future misfire issues on another cylinder.